Posts Tagged ‘Heritage Conversion’

Salient Group receives Outstanding Achievement Award from Heritage BC

October 13th, 2011

Salient Group receives Heritage BC Outstanding Achievement Award

The Salient Group, Acton Ostry Architects and Donald Luxton & Associates received the Outstanding Achievement award at Heritage BC’s annual ceremony held on September 30, 2011. Handed out for the highest caliber of achievement, the Outstanding Achievement award was given to The Salient Group this year for our contributions to the rehabilitation of the Gastown area.

Every year, Heritage BC presents awards to individuals, organizations, government and businesses for excellence in heritage conservation. We thank Heritage BC for recognizing our efforts. We are pleased with the opening of 21 Doors, and we are proud to contribute to Gastown’s rehabilitation.

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Heritage Canada Magazine profiles The Salient Group’s Robert Fung

September 19th, 2011

Heritage Canada Magazine profiles The Salient Group’s Robert Fung

Robert Fung’s contribution to the evolving Gastown area is featured in Heritage Canada Magazine’s September 2011 issue.

The article, which appears on the Faces and Places section, describes Gastown as “a vibrant, diverse community with an eclectic mix of condos, office buildings, restaurants and bars.”

Heritage Canada cites Robert’s passion for rehabilitating heritage buildings. Robert respects the history of the buildings, but “integrating sustainability and addressing economic, social and environmental imperatives” is also his priority.

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Recognition: Salient Group wins 4 City of Vancouver Heritage Honour Awards

May 26th, 2009

salient2008heritagehonourawards

The City of Vancouver Heritage Commission has awarded four of the Salient Group’s developments for building rehabilitation as follows:

The Flack Block, 163 West Hastings Street, an Award of Honour for structural, seismic and building systems upgrading, sustainable interiors, locally crafted stone façade components, reinstated areaways, extensive exterior restoration, and a compatible contemporary rooftop addition.

The Bowman Block, 528 Beatty Street, as Award of Merit for the mindful, restrained exterior preservation, rehabilitation, and adaptive reuse to commercial and residential, including a compatible contemporary loft addition.

The Paris Block, 53 West Hastings Street, an Award or Recognition for its rescue, rehabilitation and adaptive reuse, and for the social and economic benefit the project provides to the downtown neighbourhood.

The Lumbermen’s Building, 509 Richards Street, an Award of Recognition for its rehabilitation and structural upgrade, including exposing the original banking hall ceiling, and providing high quality ground floor use and office space.

>> See the complete list of our awards on the Awards page.



Globe and Mail – Heritage projects suffer collateral damage in downturn

May 8th, 2009
Robert Fung has turned some of Vancouver’s worst eyesores into high-end housing. But the financing model he used to cover the added expense of saving the city’s grand old buildings has run into a brutal new reality.

Robert Fung has turned some of Vancouver’s worst eyesores into high-end housing. But the financing model he used to cover the added expense of saving the city’s grand old buildings has run into a brutal new reality.

Globe and Mail – Heritage projects suffer collateral damage in downturn

Kerry Gold
Special to The Globe and Mail
Friday, May. 15, 2009

Developer Robert Fung stands on Water Street in Vancouver’s Gastown, surveying a row of heritage buildings that comprise one of the city’s most beautiful streetscapes.

They represent some of the city’s oldest buildings, and each of them had been long neglected until Mr. Fung came along and restored them as work, retail and condo spaces.

“He’s the poster child of heritage,” says Heritage Vancouver president Don Luxton.

But with the downturn in British Columbia’s property markets, Mr. Fung now sees himself tied to a complex financing model that no longer works.

The Alhambra building, circa 1887, anchors Water Street, the most historic block in the city. It is part of Mr. Fung’s $60-million, three-phase, five-building project that involves “a high level of heritage restoration.” The condo building Terminus, once on Heritage Vancouver’s Top Ten Endangered Sites list, is the first phase. The heritage building, with its sleek, uniquely modern interior, is finished and mostly occupied. The Garage condos next door, once the location for the city’s first jailhouse, will be complete by November.

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Flack Block: Acton Ostry – Restoration Project Receives Heritage Honour Award

March 18th, 2009

flackblock-actonostryaward

Architects Acton Ostry, were just awarded a Heritage Honour Award by the City of Vancouver’s Heritage Commission for their work on The Flack Block.

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Globe & Mail: A Piece of the 19th Century Lives Again

May 16th, 2008

Robert Fung stands in front of the brand new hand-carved stone archway at The Flack Block building.

Robert Fung stands in front of the brand new hand-carved stone archway at The Flack Block building.

A Piece of the 19th Century Lives Again
Globe & Mail
May  16, 2008

With the unveiling of an elaborate stone archway this past month, suddenly there is a lot of interest in the restoration of the Flack Block in Vancouver.


Vancouver Sun: Landmark Victorian restored

April 19th, 2008
The Flack Block, across from Victory Park at the corner of Hastings and Cambie Streets.

The Flack Block, across from Victory Park at the corner of Hastings and Cambie Streets.

 by Michael Sasges
The Vancouver Sun, Westcoast Homes
April 19, 2008

The building is a pointer to the growth of the city in the decades after the arrival of the national railways and to the contribution of Edwardian and Victorian architects to Vancouver’s first-city status in a young British Columbia.

Slideshow: Developer Robert Fung describes some of the surprises he encountered in the Flack Block. You can watch the slideshow/interview here: Vancouver Sun: Robert Fung talks about restoring the Flack Block.

His usual work the restoration of older commercial and industrial buildings for residential re-use, developer Robert Fung has passed the last two years or so organizing the restoration of an older building for commercial reuse.

The building is the Flack Block. By next year, it will have commanded the northeast corner of Hastings and Cambie in downtown Vancouver for 110 years.

The rehabilitation work reintroduced or restored:
1) Exterior features damaged or removed over the years, such as an archway
2) Exterior features that have survived the decades, such as the sandstone facades and the wood-trimmed windows
3) The original lightwell
4) The original stairwell and elevator cage

As well as adding a new top floor, the new-construction work brought a 19th-century building up to 21st-century seismic, structural and building-systems standards, and introduced a new elevator and shaft.

The building is a pointer to the growth of the city in the decades after the arrival of the national railways and to the contribution of Edwardian and Victorian architects to Vancouver’s first-city status in a young British Columbia.

‘‘The Flack Block is a significant landmark component of the early retail and commercial fabric of West Hastings when Hastings Street was one of the most prominent commercial streets in early Vancouver,” city hall staff told council. Continue reading “Vancouver Sun: Landmark Victorian restored” »